Indian school textbooks are teaching weird and inhuman things to their students.

A screenshot of one of the CBSE’s Environmental Science’s textbooks started revolving on Twitter due to its awful content.

Farhan Akhtar immediately pounced on it and denounced it .

 

 

Now Here’s what the paragraph said:

“Living things need air to breathe. No living thing can live without air for more than a few minutes. You can do an experiment. Take two wooden boxes. Make holes on the lid of one of one box. Put a small kitten in each box. Close the boxes. After some time open the boxes. What do you see? The kitten inside the box without holes has died.”

Now where did that come from?.The paragraph blatantly advocates to murder a kitten to prove “Living things need air to breathe.” It’s very  appalling that a school textbook had to stoop to such a desperate measure to drive this point home. Clearly, the statement assumes that kittens’ lives don’t matter and they don’t fall under the category of “living things.” More than that it advocated children to commit murder . That’s completely unacceptable.

This awful content invited a lot of agitated responses from the Twitterverse. 

Here are some of the reactions:

Source
Source
Source

We hope that CBSE takes a note of this and removes the appalling text with immediate effect.

We also saw the Maharashtrian state board textbooks causing an outrage by citing “ugliness” as one of the reasons for increasing dowry demands.

Source

We don’t know what the people who are writing the textbooks consume before they write such atrocious things . And where are the people who oversee them and correct the mistakes. Such apathy in carving out the next round of citizens is abominable and unpardonable. Who ever they are , that have to be punished and punished to set an example.  The contents of all the text books should be reconsidered , re-edited atleast for the next year and the teachers have to be instructed to make the children realize that this is a mistake in the text books

Featured Image Source